Content anchor
Jan Wedel's tenement house designed by Juliusz Żórawski, built between 1935 and 1936, 28 Puławska St., photo: press materials of the book Warszawa Nowoczesna. Fotografie z lat trzydziestych XX wieku by Czesław Olszewski

Polish architect and theoretician of architecture. He examined relations between architectural form and its perception as well as the time and place of creation. As he wrote: ‘Architectural form is a result of man’s activity and thus depends on human psychophysical condition and the history of the community’.

More »
Zofia and Oskar Hansen, photo: the Hansens' family archive

Architect, co-creator of the Open Form theory – the most important modern thought in Polish architecture. Born on 13th May 1924, died on 24th January 2013.

More »
Barbara Brukalska in 1927. photo: family collections.

Avant-garde architect and interior designer, architecture theorist, member of Praesens group. The first woman-professor at Warsaw University of Technology. Wife of Stanisław Brukalski, also a renown architect. Born 4 December 1899 in Brzeźce, died 6 March 1980 in Warsaw.

More »
Monika Sosnowska, The Tired Room, architectural installation, 2006, Sigmund Freud Foundation, photo: Gerald Zugmann/www.zugmann.com

The room designed by Sosnowska looks as if it was being sucked in. The planes of the floor, ceiling, and walls are creased like cardboard, creating geometrical intersections.

More »
Headquarters of the Foundation for Polish Science, photo source: press materials

The most characteristic element of this renovated pre-war villa is a vertical garden located on its external wall, which is the first realization of the kind in Central Europe. It has been designed by the architects from the FAAB studio.

More »

Lucian Korngold's famous "Rubinsky House" in Tel Aviv, photo: Krystyna Fiszer Few cities across the globe have succeeded in raising whole districts and key public buildings in the avant-garde spirit of modernism. The Polish port city of Gdynia is one such place, along with Tel Aviv and Brasilia. Find out what both links the two cities and separates them from Niemeyer's iconic and visionary capital.

More »

You are challenged to a test – can you tell the difference between Gdynia's modernist pearls and Bauhaus-styled villas from the Israeli White City?

More »
Adolf Szyszko-Bohusz, photo: Narodowe Archiwum Cyfrowe (NAC) / National Digital Archives

An architect, restorer and designer. One of the most prominent Polish architects of the first half of the 20th century. Influenced primarily by academic art, he designed buildings with traditional Polish features as well as buildings with characteristics of the height of modernism. He was the chief restorer of the Wawel Hill in Cracow and the Royal Castle in Warsaw.

More »
Maciej Nowicki, photo: UN,  New York, 1947

A modernist architect with innovative views on architecture and urban planning, better known in the United States than in Poland.

More »
Filip Springer, photo courtesy of Filip Springer

A reporter skilled in conveying the gist of the Polish landscape, writing of the city that never was, of buildings that have long stood in spite of the general public's disdain...

More »

Culture.pl delves into the sorts of "open-ended" inquiries Grospierre's work poses via several of the photographer's major projects of the past decade.

More »

As a modernist pioneer in Poland's inter-war period and influential in international architecture in the postwar era, Maciej Nowicki’s ambitious projects went beyond geographical bounds.

More »
Nicolas Grospierre in his studio, photo courtesy of the artist

Photographer and experimental artist. Born in Geneva, Switzerland on September 28, 1975. Resides permanently in Warsaw.

More »