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Cover of the book Polish Dance Avant-garde Artists. Stories and Reconstructions, edited by Joanna Szymajda, 2017. Published by the Institute of Music and Dance and the Adam Mickiewicz Institute

A dancing woman is a disgraced and dangerous woman – that was the stereotype that the most remarkable Polish avant-garde dancers had to struggle with for a long time. Their effort and passion brought them incredible artistic achievements. Their unusual lives were described in the bilingual book titled Polish Dance Avant-Garde Artists. Stories and Reconstructions

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Łódź Landscape by Władysław Strzemiński, 1932, tempera, cardboard (fragment), photo: courtesy of Muzeum Regionalnego w Stalowej Woli

The exhibition Kobro and Strzemiński: New Art in Turbulent Times is the first extensive presentation in Sweden of the work of these two pioneering and defiant avant-garde Polish artists.

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Samuel Szczekacz, self-portrait, 1940s, charcoal on cardboard, 31 x 26,6 cm, photo: Galerie Berinson, Berlin

Painter, graphic artist tied to the Łódź avantgarde community. Also worked in spatial arts, sculpture and architectural design. Born May 3, 1917 in Łódź. Died September 27, 1983 in Paris.

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Pływalnia (Swimming Pool), Ewa Maria Łunkiewicz-Rogoyska, 1939, from the collection of the National Museum in Warsaw

In the second half of 1930s, Maria Ewa Łunkiewicz-Rogoyska often included sport themes in her paintings. That period brought the oil painting Football prepared for the olympic competition organised in the Nazi Germany on the occasion of the XI Olympics in Berlin, as well as works related to the subject of recreation in Warsaw: Służewiec and Pływalnia (Swimming Pool)

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Teresa Żarnower, Europe, cover of Anatol Stern's book designed by Mieczysław Szczuka, 1929, photo: Museum of Art in Łódź

Europe (1929) is undoubtedly one of the Polish and international avant-garde’s most important works. It was a result of the cooperation between Anatol Stern, an avant-garde poet, and Mieczysław Szczuka, the leader of Polish constructivism. The cover was created by Teresa Żarnower after Szczuka's unexpected death in the Tatry Mountains.

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Leon Chwistek, Fencing, 1919, 70x100 cm, photo: National Museum in Kraków

Leon Chwistek created several fencing-themed works. Two sketches from before World War I, a gouache, two watercolours dated 1920s, and an oil painting titled Fencing, currently stored in the National Museum in Kraków, were preserved. The artist painted the latter around 1919 and it is considered to be one of Polish formism’s most important works.

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Kazimierz Podsadecki, Takie Buty!... from the series A Sentimental Robot, 1933, photo: Museum of Art in Łódź

In the early 1930s, Kazimierz Podsadecki’s art revolved mainly around American cinema. His A Sentimental Robot (1933) series was dedicated to Charlie Chaplin, who, at the time, was considered not only to be the first celebrity, but also a true icon of the international avant-garde.

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Marek Włodarski, Man with a Gramophone, 1926, oil on canvas, photo: Krzysztof Wilczyński / National Museum in Warsaw

Marek Włodarski’s (a.k.a. Henryk Streng) 1926 painting Man with a Gramophone was created by the Polish artist while he was under great influence of Fernand Léger. Since 1925, he studied painting under him in Académie Moderne in Paris. Until late 1920s, he stayed in the French capital, which allowed him to get acquainted with other avant-garde artists.

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Karol Hiller, Football Game, 1938-1939, photo: Museum of Art in Łódź

Karol Hiller's Football Game was most likely his final oil painting. It is dated 1938-39, just before the artist's death, and considered unfinished. It was painted after a period of eye-catching heliographic and biomorphic experiments which preceded Hiller's return to figurative painting.

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Ewa and Stefan Kuryłowicz, photo: courtesy of Kuryłowicz & Associates

These power couples built amazing things together. From housing complexes, family homes, to shopping centres, office buildings and religious structures these five couples helped shaped Polish architecture of of the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Katarzyna Kobro, Spatial Composition 4, 1929, steel, painted, multicolour, 40 x 64 x 40 cm, , photo courtesy of Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź

The exhibition Kobro and Strzemiński: Avant-Garde Prototypes is the first such extensive presentation of the work of these two Polish artists in one of the most important modern art museums in the world.

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Okładka (nid 4338810)

The Praesens group, bringing together avant-garde architects and artists, operated in Warsaw, with the peak of its activity falling on 1926-1929.

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Kozera’s painting style could be described as surreal existentialism, symbolism charged with eroticism, or a man’s entanglement in life, with all its painful and pleasant consequences of existence. Uncanny images show human body, which at the same time is a robe. In his canvases, spirituality and corporeality coexist organically.

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Oskar Dawicki, "Gymnastics profana", 2013, pigment ink / canvas, 200 x 100 cm, photo: courtesy of the Raster Gallery

A few dozen exhibitions commemorating the centennial of the Avant-garde movement in Poland, the 80th birthday of a Polish feminist art legend and the opening of the new headquarters of the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw. Here’s a guide to museum and gallery-related events that we are looking forward to in 2017.

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Katarzyna Kobro, around 1930-1931, photo: courtesy of Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź

Culture.pl presents seven of the most awaited and crucial artistic events for Polish art around the world in 2017.

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  Władysław Strzemiński, Theory of Seeing (critical edition), cover, image source: press materials, Łódź Art Museum

Łódź Art Museum published a collection of art history lectures which Władysław Strzemiński gave in the 1950s – the famous Theory of Seeing. It is the first critical edition of this work, which is deemed crucial for the history of Polish Modernism.

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Cover and spreads from the book Władysław Strzemiński, Theory of Seeing (critical edition). Publisher: Łódź Art Museum, 2016. The book comprises a collection of art history lectures which Władysław Strzemiński gave in the 1950s – the famous Theory of Seeing. It is the first critical edition of this work, which is deemed crucial for the history of Polish Modernism.

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Alfred Lenica, "Fobia II", 1962, oil on canvas, 146 × 89 cm , photo Piotr Hrehorowicz / National Museum in Wrocław

A new exhibition at the National Museum in Wrocław explores the works of Alfred Lenica, a prominent Polish 20th century painter. The artist created countless watercolours, monotypes, gouaches, and drawings during the German occupation of Poland, and this exhibition marks the first time when many of those works are on public display.

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Mikrokolektyw, photo. Filip Zawada (myspace)

Mikrokolektyw is a duet that continues to explore the boundaries of jazz, post-jazz and free improvisation. The band composed of Artur Majewski and Kuba Suchar demonstrates an advanced understanding of contemporary music, blending electronics with acoustic instruments as well as elements of classical jazz with the most far-out improvisation.

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The activities of the Kraków Group can be divided into two stages. The first Kraków Group operated in 1933-1937. The second Kraków Group was founded in 1957 and has never formally dissolved.

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