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Zygmunt Krauze's Canzona premieres in Amsterdam

When: 
12jan'12
Asko|Schönberg with conductor Reinbertem de Leeuw. Photo: Annaleen Louwes
Asko|Schönberg with conductor Reinbertem de Leeuw, photo: Annaleen Louwes

Polish conductor Zygmunt Krauze presents his latest work at the Muziekgebouw aan 't IJ as performed by the Dutch Asko|Schönberg group led by conductor Reinbert de Leeuw

Krauze, who only recently premiered a new opera based on Tadeusz Różewicz's Trap at the Wrocław Opera, which he produced together with Grzegorz Jarzyna and staged in December 2011. Krauze begins the new year with an entirely new work, composed for wood, brass, percussion and string instruments. The piece was commissioned by the Asko | Schönberg, a leading ensemble of seasoned and young musicians performing music of the 20th and 21st centuries. The group numbers anywhere from 5-50 at any given concert, boasting such names as Andriessen, Gubaidulina, Kagel, Kurtag, Ligeti, Stockhausen and Rihm, together with young musicians such as Van der Aa, Padding, and Widmann Zuidam. The group is currently in residence at the music hall in Amsterdam.

Canzona has been composed as a single movement, which reflects the homogenous soundscapes of his 'muzyka unistycna' inspired by the paintings of Władysław Strzemiński. Its lively rhythms are counterbalanced by unified planes of sound.

Zygmunt Krauze has been performing around the world since 1963 and his artistic pursuits have won him a number of awards and prestigious appointments. He is known as an innovator and a forerunner of the contemporary music scene in Poland and the world.

The programme on the evening of the 12th of January, 2012 also includes Louis Andriessen's La Giro (Dutch premiere) with a solo by Monica Germino, as well as Steve Reich Double Sextet Andries van Rossem Concerto (world premiere).

Muziekgebouw aan 't IJ
Piet Hein Kade January 1019 BR Amsterdam
www.muziekgebouw.nl

Source: www.pwm.com.pl, www.askoschoenberg.nl
 

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