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Polish Exploratory Music in London

When: 
22nov'10
23nov'10
Robert Piotrowicz, photo: www.polishculture.org.uk
The Two-day festival of exploratory music and trans-idiomatic improvisation presents some of the most interesting and vibrant musical movers and shakers from the Polish underground


The first day boasts Tomasz Chołoniewski (drums, percussion), Denis Kolokol (voice) and Mikołaj Pałosz (cello) performing Bogusław Schaeffer's Symphony, Electronic Music, a piece composed in Polish Radio's Experimental Studio in 1964. The old electronic score will be performed entirely acoustically by three young musicians from Krakow and Warsaw.



The first day also features a concert from Łukasz Szalankiewicz - historian, sound desinger and contemporary electronic music composer. Szalankiewicz is a member of the Polish Society for Electroacoustic Music (PSeME) and has participated in many international festivals (in Europe, USA, China and South America), curated sound art events in various festivals and CCA's in Poland. His practice extends to research audiovisuals performance and interactive installations (www.zenial.audiotong.net).

The third artist to round up the line-up is Robert Piotrowicz (analogue synthesizer, electronics). Piotrowicz is a sound artist, composer and improviser, playing contemporary electro-acoustic music and through-composed noise. His main tools as an instrumentalist are modular synth and guitar. He's an experienced improviser, working with world's top artists. He's composed/created numerous solo projects (recordings, performances), interdisciplinary projects (scores for theatre plays, literary and radio projects) and abstract sound installations and participated in many art events around the world. Piotrowicz is the co-founder and curator of the Musica Genera label/festival since 1999 and has many other contemporary sound art festivals and projects in Poland and abroad (www.robertpiotrowicz.net).

Day two (November 23) will feature act by diverse artists including Emiter, Mikołaj Palosz, Tomasz Choloniewski, Denis Kolokol who will play improvised solo and duo sets.

Emiter is the solo project of Marcin Dymiter (electronics, guitar, generator, loops, tape) who has previously played in such bands as Ewa Braun, Mapa, and Mordy. He has worked with musicians engaged with jazz, electronics and the avant-garde such as Paul Wirkus, Rosa Arruti, Rob Mazurek, Le Quan Ninh, John Butcher, Axel Dorner, and Andrew Sharpley. He has also composed for off's theaters, works with visual artists and performs live to silent films (www.emiter.art.pl).

Mikołaj Pałosz is a freelance cellist, contemporary music performer and improviser. He graduated from the Chopin Academy of Music in Warsaw with Kazimierz Michalik and Andrzej Bauer. He has won prizes at music competitions including the Penderecki International Contemporary Chamber Music Competition in Kraków and Lutosławski International Cello Competition in Warsaw. He is also a member of Netherlands-based Cello Octet Amsterdam (formerly Conjunto Ibérico) and Warsaw CELLONET Group. His solo album Cellovator with contemporary compositions and improvisations has been released recently by DUX label (www.cellovator.com/Mikołaj_Pałosz/home.html).

Denis Kolokol is a composer and performer of electronic and electro-acoustic music, specialising in interactive music systems. In 2006 and 2007 he was the main person behind the international festival Replica (Almaty KZ) for experimental music. He started his own musical activity in 2006 and has been collaborating with Alexander Chikmakov in the duo theVolume for guitar and computer. As a solo artist he combines non-intersecting and opposing elements: interactive performance with algorithmic composition, granular synthesis with sound poetry, etc. He mainly works with his own voice as a pure material for electronic alterations. The live performances are usually strong and loud, always highly emotional, but playful and not without a sense of humor.



A special podcast on 17 November from 20:00-21:00 can be heard on Resonance 104.4FM or www.resonancefm.com.

Many of the artists coming to the event featured in Biba Kopf's article "Poland's Hidden Reverse" in the July 2010 issue of the WIRE magazine. For more information listen to Biba Kopf's radio programme "The Strangeness of Existence" on Radio Joy.

For more information, see:www.myspace.com/deniskolokol
Cafe OTO
18 - 22 Ashwin Street
London E8 3DL
Source: www.polishculture.org.uk

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