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Designing Polska – Design in Poland at London Design Festival

Where: 
United Kingdom
Hanbury Street
London
When: 
18sep'14
21sep'14
Illustration created by Aleksandra Mizielińska and Danie Mizielińskil
Illustration created by Aleksandra Mizielińska and Danie Mizieliński

Designing Polska – Design in Poland is an overview of Poland’s finest graphic designers and illustrators. The exhibition, running for four days during the London Design Festival, features some of Poland’s best-known creative talents, who have brought a spectrum of commercial and experimental work in unique, distinctive styles.

The collection on show paints a complex picture of a rapidly changing Poland – not only the country’s contemporary culture but also the way the country is being designed for the future.

For the exhibition organised by Culture.pl Olka Osadzińska has curated the work of 10 graphic designers and 10 illustrators – as well as selected book and magazine designers, self-publishers, poster designers and fashion designers who rely on illustration and graphics in their work. Many of the participants have worked internationally, exhibiting their efforts throughout Europe, across Japan and in magazines like The New Yorker. The vast body of work is a testimony to a burgeoning Polish culture, rapid economic development and strong visual tradition. According to the curator who is an illustrator herself, Poland's best designers prove  that their portfolios can compete with projects on an international level.

The content of the exhibition echoes recent Polish history and political change. Visitors will have the opportunity to see how artistic self-expression in Poland ties in to visual identity, publishing, book design, product design, press and poster illustration.

The exhibition features  works of such artists as Edgar Bąk, Agata Królak, Magdalena Łapińska, Aleksandra Mizielińska and Daniel Mizieliński, Mamastudio, Ola Niepsuj, Michał Łojewski, Noviki, Hakobo,  Jakub Jezierski Pionty, Fontarte, Full Metal Jacket, Jan Dudzik, Homework Studio, Agata Endo Nowicka, Arobal, Dawid Ryski, Anna Niemierko, Jan Bajtlik, Katarzyna Bogucka, Mieczysław Wasilewski, Tomasz Walenta, Filip Pągowski, Tymek Jezierski,  Patryk Hardziej.


The exhibition will be accompanied by the publication of Design in Poland Directory, presenting the most interesting creators of graphic design and illustration.

Source: press release, ed. GS, 26.08.2014

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