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Vegetables on the table, photo: Mariusz Grzelak/Reporter

Even though Polish cuisine has a reputation of being quite meat and potato-heavy, we Poles actually invented a whole bunch of interesting ways of eating vegetables. No meal is complete without them.

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Трубочки с кремом. Фото: рекламные материалы, «Znak»

Want to eat Polish but vegan? Here's a decidedly Polish selection from a new cookbook all about delicious vegan cooking.

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Polish affinity to herbs has a long history, but is also very much in tune with the modern ideas of healthy natural living. How does one lead a healthy, herbal life – the Polish way?

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Piotrkowska 217, photo: promo materials

The restaurant scene in Łódź has become more and more varied, and eating out is possible even on the most limited budget. Whether you're a tourist or from Poland itself, there are plenty of options for all tastes – trendy spots such as Off Piotrkowska with its many pubs, clubs and bistros are a haven for hipsters, whilst Manufaktura shopping centre attracts families.

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Forum Przestrzenie. Photo: press materials

Hungry? On a budget? The dining options in Kraków for students and travellers are becoming richer and more varied. Lovers of Polish, European and more unusual flavours will all find something to satisfy their appetites. Culture.pl presents a list of some of the most popular places where you can sit down and enjoy a hot meal – cheap!

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Picking raspberries in Zalesie, photo Wojciech Pacewicz/PAP

Come May, Polish streets, markets and homes are filled with fresh strawberries. Later on, in June, July and August, raspberries and sweet cherries come into the mix, not to mention blueberries, blackberries, gooseberries and black, red and white currants. Here’s Culture.pl's guide on how to make the most of the berry season in Poland!

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Despite what they’re called in Polish, Greek fish, Canadian sausages and Japanese herring aren’t foods that actually come from the countries they refer to. In fact, most people from these places would be rather surprised if they ever encountered them. Read on to learn about these and other amusing, albeit misleading, country references in Poland’s culinary language.

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Czerwony Rower, Warszawa, photo. Adam Stępień / AG

What can people on a budget have for a cheap and filling lunch in Warsaw? Well, a lot more than just pizza, hamburgers or take-away noodles. Culture.pl shows you where to eat a decent lunch for less than 20 Polish zloty, while broadening your culinary horizons and enjoying new tastes at the same time.

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Pheasant, photo: East News

The tradition of organising New Year’s Eve parties in Poland goes back to the mid-19th century. Before that, New Year celebrations could hardly be described as boisterous. The night didn't differ much from others, apart from the custom of trying to predict what lay ahead in terms of marriages, harvests and the weather.

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Moczka, photo: Paweł Kiszkiel /AG

Polish culinary tradition is extremely varied and each region serves dishes virtually unknown in other parts of the country. This fact is no different when it comes to Poland’s famous Christmas Eve dinner. Here are Culture.pl's suggestions for an alternative regional Christmas menu.

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At the Christmas Eve table, photo: Michał Jankowski / Forum

If you ever end up spending Christmas in Poland, we have some good news and some bad news. The good news is that it will be the warmest, most unforgettable Christmas experience. The bad news is that some of the traditions might be too surprising to face unprepared, so better read Culture.pl’s guide to avoid unnecessary stress and possible faux pas.

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This pastry shop has existed since 1925 in the Warsaw district of Wola, and they still use the pre-war recipe to make their popular pączki.

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Ever wondered about the nature of the universe and the role of quarks? Now you can find out what links the word for the most elementary particle in the universe with the name of the ancient Slavic food specialty. And why it must be James Joyce.

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Magdalena Tomaszewska-Bolałek, Polish Culinary Paths, book cover

What is the Polish taste, what does Poland taste like? The Oriental studies scholar and a researcher in culinary culture, an author of culinary books and head of Food Studies at University of Social Sciences and Humanities, has prepared a guide to Polish tastes, commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Polish Embassy in Seoul.

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Staging of a Slavic ceremony near Warta River, photo: Marcin Stępień / Agencja Gazeta

Centuries ago, the typical daily menu of the Slavic tribes in the area of modern-day Poland consisted of herbs and mushrooms. They also consumed a lot of grain, modest quantities of meat and vegetables as well as the ancestor of the beetroot soup currently known as barszcz.

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knedle ze śliwkami

Can you imagine having dessert served as a main meal? Well, Poles can. Here comes a mini-guide to a culinary custom that can weird out foreigners...

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Selection of craft Polish ciders, photo:  Tomasz Piotrowski / Cydrolot

The Lublin Association of Cider Lovers have announced that the region will soon become famous for its cider, just like the Tuscany area is known for its wines.

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Milk bars are egalitarian diners where you can eat a portion of pierogi in thirty minutes or less, and they are popular with every social category. Milk bars are often considered a communist legacy, but in fact their existence predates the communist era.

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Chłodnik, photo: Grażyna Makara

Poland, the land of bigos, sérnik, and pierogi. It’s a culinary paradise…unless you can’t eat certain things. Foreigners aren't always the most enthusiastic about Polish cuisine due to dietary restrictions. However, it is definitely possible to eat a wide array of vegetarian, lactose-free, and gluten-free foods while in Poland.

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Drowning of the 10-meters tall Marzanna in Jeziorzany, Poland, 2014. Photo: Jacek Świerczyński / Forum

Every country has customs that shock and confuse foreigners. Polish people going about their daily business or celebrating special occasions often do things that will make your jaw drop, but are considered perfectly normal here.

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