Content anchor
Demonstrator of bullet-proof vest, 1923, photo: Harris & Ewing Collection (Library of Congress)

It’s 16th March 1897 in Chicago. Two men stand face-to-face in a huge square, one pointing a revolver at the other. It seems like the whole city is there watching: the mayor, the chief of police, a mob of spectators, and a priest, just in case...

More »
Юзеф Ретингер в лондонской больнице приходит в себя после того, как его пытались отравить в Польше, фотографировал Тадеуш «Кельт» Хчук

Amongst all the controversial figures of the first half of the 20th century, one man stands out. Allegedly a quadruple agent, a lord of Freemasonry, a Catholic Jew, a clandestine communist, and a persevering Polish patriot.

More »
Cover of the national anthem's score. Chant national polonais: Poland is Not Yet Lost, Józef Wybicki (1747-1822). Source: Polona.pl

Dabrowski’s Mazurka became the Polish national anthem over 90 years ago. But competition for that honoured title was tough, and each of the songs that just missed out has an interesting story of their own.

More »

Manuel Rosa, a Portuguese historian, claims that the man who discovered America was not of Genoese origin as is commonly believed, but descended from a Polish King. Culture.pl investigates his hypothesis.

More »
Maria Skłodowska-Curie after receiving her honorary degree at the University of Birmingham, 1913.  photo: Wydawnictwo Studio Emka

Marie Skłodowska-Curie ‒ she used both names ‒ was a trailblazer in more than just science. More than ever, her strong principles and ground-breaking ideas are worth discovering, particularly for what she can teach us today.

More »
​Krystyna Skarbek, photo: www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yNoGCSGX6M​

If you were to read only one story of a wartime hero in your life, you should seriously consider this one – the story of a Polish-Jewish countess, a woman way ahead of her time, Winston Churchill’s favourite, and one of the most successful spies in the history of espionage.

More »
Świętowit vel Svantevit, a statue of the pagan Slavic god; Photo: Andrzej Sidor / Forum

Unlike some creatures of ancient Slavic demonology, like vampires and strigoi, which went on to earn some worldwide notoriety and even became part of popular culture, Slavic mythology remains to a large extent a terra incognita.

More »
Jan Matejko, Christianisation of Poland, from the cycle of paintings History of civilisation in Poland, photo: National Museum in Warsaw

2016 marks the 1050th anniversary of the Baptism of Poland, which is being celebrated with a series of international events such as concerts and exhibitions.

More »
The empty painting carried by the procession. Photo: Mirosław Stankiewicz/FORUM

It is every totalitarian system’s aim to not only control legislative, executive, and judicial power but also to rule people’s hearts and minds. This is why, immediately after the installation of Communist satellite governments on the eastern side of the Iron Curtain, their leaders tried to suppress any kind of ideological competition.

More »
Photograph from the album Gulag by Tomasz Kizny, photo: courtesy of IPN

Leicestershire Council has recently made public the recorded memories of the Poles and their families living in the county. Why have Poles been living there for over 60 years now? Would you believe that people who were deported to Siberia faced even worse hardship after the war?

More »
Frank Stella, Olkienniki III, 1972, photo: courtesy of the artist / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York

Between 19th February and 20th June 2016, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews will host an exhibition by Frank Stella, one of the most prominent contemporary American artists. The exhibition will present his Polish Villages relief series along with pre-war photographs and drawings of the wooden synagogues which inspired them.

More »
Gdańsk, 1988. Strike at the Gdańsk Lenin Shipyard, photo: Jerzy Kosnik/Forum

You probably think that learning the history of Poland in a mere 10 minutes is impossible, even insane. Give Culture.pl 10 minutes to prove you wrong.

More »
Centennial Hall in Wrocław, photo: Museum of Architecture in Wrocław

Book of Henryków, the earliest document to include a sentence written in Polish, as well as a Mars rover Scorpio III can be viewed during the exhibition 7 Wonders of Wrocław and Lower Silesia. The exhibition housed in the Old Town Hall is a part of the European Capital of Culture Wrocław 2016’s programme.

More »
Olga Lubacz aboard the TSS Stefan Batory, 1987, photo: family archive

Culture.pl thanks everybody for all their stories and photos from the decks of two transoceanic legends: the MS Batory (in service for 36 years) and her younger sister, the TSS Stefan Batory.

More »
A page of the Voynich Manuscript

In 1912, the Polish bookseller and former revolutionary activist Michał Wojnicz, better known as Wilfrid Voynich, came into the possession of a mysterious, peculiarly illustrated 15th century book written in what appeared to be a peculiar foreign language.

More »
The teardown of Konev's monument,Kraków,  1991, photo: Stanisław Gawliński/FOTONOVA

Warsaw, Poznań and Białystok, as well as many other Polish cities, were virtually razed to the ground during World War II, suffering under the subsequent marches of hostile armies. Meanwhile, Kraków, the biggest and most crucial city of southern Poland, remained almost untouched. How did Kraków make it through the war with hardly a scratch?

More »
Władysław Bartoszewski, Warsaw, 2011, photo by Ryszard Waniek /Fotorzepa/Forum

Journalist, historian, writer, politician. Born on 19th February, 1922 in Warsaw. Died on 24th April, 2015.

More »
Mexican ship Cuauhtemoc in Gdynia, photo by Marek Michalak / East News

The history of Polish-Mexican relations goes back to the 16th century when Jan Dantyszek, an intellectual friar from Gdańsk, was sent to Spain to serve as a diplomat for Sigismund the old, king of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1506 until 1548.

More »
A swimming area on the outskirts of Wroclaw, summer 1982, photo by Chris Niedenthal / Forum

We are all taught at school about the communism as a social system but do we really know what it meant for those who had a chance to experience it themselves? Empty stores, propaganda, censorship but also a universe of funny things which tried hard to be better than what it was.

More »
Market place under the Palace of Culture and Science, 1992, photo: Aleksander Jałosiński / Forum

Wherever we are born, our national identity begins to be shaped by the myths we are told in our very childhood. While deconstructing our own myths may be painful, I believe that discovering the mythology of others is fascinating. This is why I – born and raised in Poland – decided to share the story of my personal uncovering of a few truths about being Polish.

More »

Pages