Content anchor

Borsht, or barszcz in Polish, is an umbrella term for several soups based on sour broth. It has been a part of Slavic culture since time immemorial, and it is just as popular as it was fourteen centuries ago.

More »
Christmas table ready for 12 vegan dishes, photo: Diana Domin / Forum

For Poles, Christmas Eve is one of the most important holidays, and, of course, is mostly just about eating. And Poles take their festive food very seriously. An old tradition has it that a 12-dish Christmas Eve dinner is a must. Culture.pl introduces you to a new wave of this tradition, with a surprising twist: it's 100% vegan.

More »
Fotografia z wystawy prac powstałych podczas warsztatów Marka Cecuły w Zakładach Porcelany Ćmielów, "Art Food", Poznań, lipiec 2013, fot. Modus Design

Students from Poland and other parts of the world will once again meet each other during workshops, where culinary art comes across design. Under the careful eye of a Polish designer Marek Cecuła they will compose meals on ceramic tableware created on their own. The effects of their work will be showcased in Gdańsk, London and New York.

More »
Grandfather Ignacy's Apiary, photo: Rafał Meszka / East News

EU certifications have recently become a much sought-after ennoblement for regional food products, and since Poland's accession in 2004, several ancestral regional recipes have been invited to join this elite club.

More »
Szakszuka, fot.: East News

Polish and Jewish culinary traditions have strongly intertwined, and despite the historical events and the extent of time that has passed – their common culinary culture lives on.

More »

It has been known in Poland for centuries, not only as the basis of diets during periods of fasting, but also a tasty and healthy snack. Even before 1939, restaurants served it before lunch as an appetiser, usually with a shot of cold vodka.

More »

Vegan Polish cuisine? It's absolutely possible, claims Marta Dymek, foodie and author of the popular food blog Jadlonomia.com.

More »
Market in Istanbul, photo: AMI

Three prominent Turkish chefs and one from Poland created a collection of Polish-Turkish fusion recipes that take both cuisines to new heights and places. Is fusion cuisine a tool of culinary natural selection or a modern atrocity?

More »
Kraków, fotoğraf: Grzegorz Kozakiewicz / Forum

Polish cuisine is the result a treasured lore of ancestral ingredients, and has recently bloomed from virtual obscurity to one of the rising stars of the European scene. Its great advantage over long-time favorites like French or Italian fare is its range of unexpected tastes: the sharp pungency of mustard plants, the sparkle of fermentation, and umami galore.

More »
Pączki, fot: Tomasz Paczos / Forum

The French have their croissants and pains au chocolate, the Poles have drożdżówki - sweet buns with different filling: poppy seeds, twaróg, pudding or seasonal fruit. Discover the delicious secrets of Polish pastries and cakes.

More »

Celebrity chefs, pastry makers, farmers and butchers, culinary careers are undergoing a revolution.

More »
Łazanki, photo: Grażyna Makara

Hated by some and beloved by others, this Polish ‘lasagna’ can bring back bitter memory of communist food canteens or tastes of childhood

More »
Sheet from the book Coffe and Cookies at Any Time of the Day: the History of Kraków Cafés and Pastry Shops with the map of cafés around main square in Cracow , photo: Culture.pl

The European tradition of quaint cafés serving elaborate pastries to dandified patrons was perhaps born in Vienna, but it also has distinctly Polish roots. Have a seat, order an espresso and a meringue and dig into centuries of café and pastry shop lore in Central Europe.

More »
Kadr z filmu "Nie ma róży bez ognia", reż. Stanisław Bareja, 1974. Na zdjęciu: Jacek Federowicz i Chwalibóg Maria, fot. fot. Studio Filmowe Kadr / Filmoteka Narodowa / www.fototeka.fn.org.pl

The culinary tastes of the generations born in the PPR (the Polish People’s Republic) were shaped mostly by canteen food and home cooking, which was based on inventiveness forced by the economic situation. Traditional cookery was replaced by nutritional knowledge and taste by caloric content. Food was treated as mere fuel for the working class and peasantry

More »
Still from "The Revenge" (Zemsta) 1956, photo Studio Filmowe Kadr /  photo Filmoteka Narodowa/www.fototeka.fn.org.pl

Every country has a national drink. Poland, is associated with vodka. In the last couple of years thanks to legislative reforms local breweries, wineries, small scale production of craft fruit liqueurs and ciders is returning to work after a long leave of absence.

More »
Arrangement of fall vegetables, photo Grażyna Makara

More and more culinarily conscious Poles stop shopping at supermarket and choose to search for new or forgotten tastes at their local farmer, in a secluded orchard, or in food trucks. The most radical ones take up guerilla gardening. Here’s our subjective review of the latest food trends.

More »
Grilled bream with homemade fries and roasted vegetables, photos from press materials of  Concordia Design

The worldwide evolution, or even revolution, of contemporary cooking didn’t spare Polish cuisine. What are the looks, flavours, and surprises of contemporary cooking from Poland? An array of talented chefs are after the answer to these questions, as they draw upon their experience from abroad, mingling modern cooking techniques with elements of Polish nature.

More »
Kaszanka, photo: Michał Kośc /Agencja Wschód / Reporter

Unknown in Polish territory until the 17th century, kaszanka must have made its way to Poland from either Denmark or from Germany, through Silesia. Wherever it first came from, it is eaten to this day, although in the 17th century it was considered repulsive.

More »
Kotlet schabowy, photo source: tastycolours.blogspot.com

Kotlet schabowy: in its most traditional form, this pork cutlet coated with breadcrumbs should be fried on lard, served with potatoes and browned or pickled cabbage.

More »
Carp Jewish style, photo: Andrzej Zygmuntowicz / Reporter / Forum

There is no exaggeration in stating that carp is a culinary symbol of Polish Christmas Eve. On this day, Poles usually eat the fish fried in batter or breadcrumbs, served cold in a jelly, or simmered with sweet seasonings – the so-called Jewish carp recipe. At times the fish is also served with a typical gray gravy.

More »

Pages