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The Przypkowskis Museum of Jedrzejow


Kościuszki 7/8
Jędrzejów, Poland

Brak przypisanych miejsc.

Opening hours: Closed Mondays and days; open all other days, 8am-3pm.

The Przypkowskis first made their astronomical and gnomonic collection available to visit by those interested in 1909. The Museum is still partly housed in their family house, although the holdings are nowadays also displayed inside the adjacent eighteenth century pharmacy building. The Museum has always been managed by members of this world-famous family of gnomonic experts. It was a Przypkowski - Tadeusz - who built the set of seven clocks at the astronomical observatory at Greenwich. At the core of the holdings is the world's largest collection of almost all types of sundials from various parts of the globe. Horizontal, vertical, multiple, altitude, equatorial sundials ranging in date from the fifteenth century to contemporary times are all represented. The holdings also include astronomical, gnomonic and other time measuring instruments, such as hourglasses, fire clocks and mechanical clocks. Among the highlights of the collection is a seventeenth-century sundial made in Prague, an eighteenth-century Parisian clock with a gun that would fire at twelve noon, as well as mechanical fireplace clocks and cased watches, including a lady's pectoral watch made of rock crystal.

The old pharmacy building is home to an exhibition of seventeenth and eighteenth century interiors, their walls decorated with, among other things, Rococo cordovans, the only such collection in Poland. The holdings of pharmaceutical and catering utensils, such as pans, kettles, samovars and the like, as well as of restaurant menus, are displayed in the cellars.

Open to visitors are also the restored interiors of the Przypkowski house. Dating from the early twentieth century, the house is where a part of the collection is displayed, including fifty models of sundials which Feliks Przypkowski made using old descriptions.

Muzeum im. Przypkowskich w Jędrzejowie
pl. Kościuszki 7/8
28-300 Jędrzejów
Region: świętokrzyskie
Phone: (+48 41) 386 24 45
Phone/Fax: (+48 41) 386 54 89

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