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The Anna and Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz Museum in Stawisko

Where: 

Gołębia 1
Stawisko, Poland

Brak przypisanych miejsc.
stawisko.plAnna and Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz Museum in Stawisko

The museum is housed in a villa that was built in 1928 and designed by S. Gadzikiewicz. It was founded in 1984, as provided for in his last will.

The villa, along with all its furnishings, a typical interior for a home of wealthy members of the Polish intelligentsia, had been a gift to Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz, a twentieth-century Polish author, and his wife, Anna, by her father, Stanislaw Lilpop. The interiors include furniture and items from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the most valuable pieces are a baroque escritoire dating from the early eighteenth century, a nineteenth century dining room set, Iwaszkiewicz's own fully-furnished study, as well as numerous works of art paintings by Polish painters such as J. Simler, J. Chelmonski, J. Stanislawski, W. Kostrzewski, J. Falat, S. I. Witkiewicz and others; a library with volumes from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including first editions of Polish Romantics, such as the first edition of  LORD THADDEUS by A. Mickiewicz, the first complete edition of the DICTIONARY OF THE POLISH LANGUAGE by S. B. Linde; and the personal archives of J. Iwaszkiewicz, including his manuscripts, correspondence, family documents and photographs.

The permanent exhibit includes the original interiors of what was the family home of the Iwaszkiewicz family until 1980, i.e. three rooms on the ground floor: the dining room, library and gallery; the main hall with a staircase leading to the first floor; and three rooms on the first floor: the study, bedroom and a guest room.

Muzeum im. Anny i Jarosława Iwaszkiewiczów
ul. Gołębia 1
Stawisko
Region: woj. mazowieckie
Phone: (+48 22) 758 93 63
Phone/Fax: (+48 22) 729 14 21
WWW: www.stawisko.pl
Email: stawisko@stawisko.pl

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