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Yulianna Avdeeva Performs with the New York Philharmonic

When: 
4jan'11
Yulianna Avdeeva, photo: www.polishculture-nyc.org
The winner of the 16th International Chopin Piano Competition Yulianna Avdeeva will perform with the New York Philharmonic at the seat of the orchestra in Lincoln Center

This is Avdeeva's second performance with the New York Philharmonic, the first being the concert conducted by Alan Gilbert at Warsaw Philharmonic on October 29, 2010, marking the finale of the Chopin Competition. That evening Avdeeva performed Chopin's Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor Op. 11, which she had also performed in the final stage of the competition. The privilige to play with America's most historic symphonic institution comes as part of the Chopin Competition winning award.

At Avery Fisher Hall in New York the Russian pianist will play the same concerto with orchestra, again, under Alan Gilbert. On this night Gilbert will also conduct a performance of Piotr Tschaikovsky's Nutcracker Op. 71, Act 2.

Yulianna Avdeeva won First Prize in the 16th International Frédéric Chopin Competition in Warsaw on October 20, 2010. The first woman to win this competition in 45 years, she was also awarded the Krystian Zimerman Prize for the best performance of a sonata. In addition to her subscription debut with the New York Philharmonic, she will also appear for the first time with the NHK Symphony Orchestra in Tokyo, led by Charles Dutoit.

Ms. Avdeeva has won a number of other prizes including the Bremen Piano Contest 2003 and the Concours de Genève 2006. At the age of 12 she received the First Prize of the International Carl Czerny Young Pianists Competition in Prague. Her honors also include First Prize in the Arthur Rubinstein in Memoriam Competition.

Born 1985 in Moscow, Yulianna Avdeeva began her piano studies at age five with Elena Ivanova at the Gnessin Special School of Music for highly gifted young musicians. In 2003 she entered the Zurich University of the Arts to study with Konstantin Scherbakov, for whom she also served as assistant from 2006 to 2009. At the same time, she worked with Vladimir Tropp at the Gnessin Music Academy. In 2008 she graduated in both Zurich and Moscow with top grades and was accepted at the renowned International Piano Academy Lake Como.

Yulianna Avdeeva's repertoire spans a wide range of music, from Bach to composers of the 20th century. In addition to her work as a soloist she enjoys playing chamber music, and recorded Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata on a historic fortepiano.

Source: www.polishculture-nyc.org


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