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Witkacy the Star of the Polish Cultural Week in Nancy

Where: 
France
43 du Sergent Blandan
Nancy
When: 
14mar'17
18mar'17
A photo self-potrait of Witkacy, photo: from the collection of Ewa Franczak and Stefan Okołowicz

A photo self-potrait of Witkacy, photo: from the collection of Ewa Franczak and Stefan Okołowicz

This year’s Polish Cultural Week in Nancy, France will focus on Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz, one of the leaders of European modernism and the most prominent Polish artists of the 20th century.

Nancy’s Polish Cultural Week will take place under the slogan Witkacy: A Multi-dimensional Artist – Yesterday and Today and will be comprised of numerous theatrical performances, panels discussions, an academic conference as well as the opening of the exhibition Witkacy: A Beginning…, which will showcase reproductions of Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz’s paintings from the Museum of Middle Pomerania in Słupsk.

The theme of the Polish Cultural Week alludes to the modern trends of reading Witkacy’s work, which were set by Witkacy scholars in France. Numerous experts and scholars will take place in the conference including Witkacy expert, Anna Saignes, researcher of Witkacy’s aesthetics, Teresa Pękala, author of the monography of his works, Barbara Forysiewicz, as well as Beata Zgodzińska, curator of the Witkiewicz collection at the Museum of Middle Pomerania in Słupsk. The conference is under the patronage of a committee led by Professor Janusz Degler, the prominent Witkacy scholar.

Witkacy: A Multi-dimensional Artist – Yesterday and Today Polish Cultural Week in Nancy was organised as a result of the Polish Year in France organised by the Adam Mickiewicz Institute in 2004. 

Polish Cultural Week in Nancy Programme
 

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

  • 6:00 PM    The opening of the exhibition Witkacy: A Beginning…
    Venue: 
    Galerie Nancy Thermal, 43 du Sergent Blandan, Nancy
  • The exhibition will be on until 19 March 2017


Wednesday, 15 March 2017

  • 5:00 PM: A meeting with Beata Zgodzinska, Curator of the Witkacy Collection at the Museum of Middle Pomerania in Słupsk
    Venue: The History of European Culture Institute, Place de la 2ième DC, Lunéville


Thursday, 16 March 2017

  • 8:30 PM: A performance of Dementia Praecox by the Théâtre Laboratoire Elizabeth Czerczuk from Paris, followed by a discussion with the director and the actors
    Venue: Social Sciences Faculty, Université de Lorraine, 23 Boulevard Albert 1er, Nancy


Friday, 17 March 2017

  • 9.00 AM – 5:00 PMWitkacy: A Multi-dimensional Artist – Yesterday and Today Conference
    Venue: Social Sciences Faculty, Université de Lorraine, Room no. A104, 23 Boulevard Albert 1er, Nancy
     
  • 7:00 PM: Guided tour of the Witkacy: A Beginning… exhibition a meeting with  Beata Zgodzinska, Curator of the Witkacy Collection at the Museum of Middle Pomerania in Słupsk Venue: Galerie Nancy Thermal, 43 du Sergent Blandan, Nancy


Saturday, 18 March 2017

  • 5:00 PM: Writing Madness, the Madness of Writing: Witkacy in the Historical and Literary Context of Central Europe, a session with Dr. Mateusz Chmurski from the                 Université libre de Bruxelles
    Venue: Galerie Nancy Thermal, 43 du Sergent Blandan, Nancy
     
  • 6:30 PMUnsatiated, a musical and lyrical performance by the Polish group Quercus Melodica Venue: Lillebonne Cultural Centre, Nancy, 14 Rue du Cheval Blanc, Nancy 
     
  • 7:45 PM      Our Modern Witkacy, a session with Jessica Dalle, director of the play Walpurg-Tragédie inspired by Witkacy’s works
    Venue: Lillebonne Cultural Centre, Nancy, 14 Rue du Cheval Blanc, Nancy
     
  • 8:45 PM     A performance of Mother by the by the Théâtre Laboratoire Elizabeth Czerczuk from Paris, followed by a discussion the director and the actors
    Venue: Lillebonne Cultural Centre, Nancy, 14 Rue du Cheval Blanc, Nancy
     
  • 10:00 PM  Conclusion of the Polish Cultural Week

Source: press materials; compiled by KB, March 2017, translated by NR, 13 March 2017

Allow us to introduce you to the quirks that make Witkacy the prototypical hipster. Read more about: An Alternative Biography of Witkacy

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