The King's Singers Perform Polish Sacred Music

King's Singers

London's St. James' Church hosted a concert presenting both classic and contemporary Polish music, given by the Grammy award winning The King's Singers

The concert formed part of the four concerts comprising the series "Polish Sacred Music Gaude Mater 2011". The series take place in London, Paris, Moscow and Kiev, with The King's Singers featuring in the London edition.

Music from a younger generation of artists was featured alongside pieces from the most outstanding Polish composers, including Bartłomiej Pękiel, Mikołaj Zieleński and Henryk Mikołaj Górecki. The concert also includes the premiere of a new work by Paweł Łukaszewski: founder of 'Musica Sacra' Competition.

The King’s Singers are one the world’s most appreciated vocal ensembles, both by music lovers and by critics. They were awarded the prestigious Grammy Award in 2009.

The group, one of the world’s most celebrated ensembles, consists of David Hurley (countertenor), Timothy Wayne-Wright (countertenor), Paul Phoenix (tenor), Philip Lawson (baritone), Christopher Gabbitas (baritone) and Jonathan Howard (bass).

Championing the work of young and established composers, from Gesualdo and György Ligeti to Michael Bublé, The King’s Singers are instantly recognisable for their spot-on intonation and impeccable vocal blend. During the 2011-12 concert season, The King’s Singers will perform across the world in some of the world’s most beautiful concert halls including the Salle Gaveau in Paris, the Berlin Philharmonie, and the Warsaw Philharmonic Concert Hall. The King’s Singers will travel to France, Germany, the US and Canada, Bulgaria, Hungary, Italy, the United Arab Emirates, Poland, Armenia, Belgium and the Netherlands, Austria, Luxembourg, Finland, Mexico, Japan, Korea and China, and will be featured artists at the prestigious Schleswig Holstein Music festival in July 2011.

In addition to their sold-out concerts worldwide, and a discography of well over 150 recordings, The King’s Singers have garnered both awards and significant critical acclaim. Members of the ensemble share their artistry through numerous workshops and master classes. They have clocked up phenomenal sales of sheet music with over two million pieces of print in circulation with current publisher Hal Leonard. The King’s Singers’ arrangements are sung by schools, college choirs and amateur and professional ensembles the world over.

For more information, see:

Date: 10th of November, 2011

Venue: St James' Church, London

Organised by: The King's Singers

Project cofinanced by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of the Republic of Poland.

Source: Adam Mickiewicz Institute

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