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Szymanowski - Symphony or Concert?


Sinfonietta Polonia, photo. Dawid Domański


A symphonic concert featuring the music of Polish composer Karol Szymanowski will include the "IV Symphony 'Symphonie Concertante', Op. 60" for piano and orchestra as well as "II Symphony B-major, Op. 10"

The concert's title refers to the first piece, Szymanowski's "IV Symphony" which exhibits both symphonic and concerto elements. The piece, with its tripartite nature, was written by Szymanowski to include both solo parts, very much informed by a concerto style, as well as strong orchestral themes. The first part is light and lyrical, followed by a more sentimental nocturne, whilst the third part is lively and folkloric. The piece is characterised by its energy and dynamism. 

The second piece, "II Symphony, Op. 19" is regarded as one of Szymanowski's most accomplished orchestral works and one of the most important pieces in the history of Polish symphony. It represents a more accomplished technical phase within the composer's repertoire. 

Although the style of the composition is stylistically closer to Late Romanticism, one can still "clearly start to hear Szymanowski - with his individualistic 'blurring' of the string verse and placing it in a higher register, in his exstatic exhausting [of the melody], through the great waves of emotion, from the quick change from lyricism to rapture, from drama to sudden calm" claims Tadeusz A. Zieliński.


Cheung Chau - director

Sinfonietta Polonia

Maria Masycheva - piano

The concert takes place in the Beijing Concert Hall-China's first professional concert hall and currently one of the main Chinese performance spaces for international classical music. 

The concert is part of the International Karol Szymanowski Festival, entitled "Karol Szymanowski - an artist before his time"

Date: 7th of August, 2011.

Venue: Beijing Concert Hall, Beijing

Organisers: APOLLO Music Foundation, the Embassy of the Republic of Poland in China, China National Symphony Orchestra – Biuro of International Affairs, CEA China-Europa-America International Culture & Trade Ltd, Berlin, Laiyin Suny Arts Center, Beijing Chinad.

Project cofinanced by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of the Republic of Poland

Source: Adam Mickiewicz Institute

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