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"In The Garden of Light" Illuminates Kiev

When: 
30sep'11
The Poznań Boys' Choir

The Poznań Boys' Choir is one of the most recognised European singing groups for boys and is led by Jacek Sykulski. During the 'In the Garden of Light' concert the choir will perform the works of S. Rachmaninov, M. Zieleński, C. Monteverdi, J.S. Bach, Z. Preisner, and J. Sykulski, among others

The concert will represent a mystical musical journey through the ages- from songs inspired by Middle Age compositions, through the Renaissance and Baroque periods, to contemporary works.


The Poznan Boy's Choir was founded on the 1st of September, 2003 as a new, independent cultural institution by the president of Poznań as a means of preserving an older group dating back to 1945, formed by the accomplished conductor Jerzy Kurczewski (1924-1995).

 

The choir has performed over 3000 times in many countries across the globe. It has taken part in prestigious music festivals and performed in New York's Carnegie Hall, the Berlin Philharmonic, the Hungarian Musikverein, the Berlin Dom, the Notre Dame in Paris, Berlin's Konzerthaus, Gewandhaus in Lipsk, the St Petersburg Philharmonic and the Matsumoto Harmony Hall in Japan. The group has released a number of CDs, featuring a wide range of contemporary compositions. Between 1992 – 2003 the choir was active as part of the "Poznań Boys' Choir" society – Polish Nightingales.


Jacek Sykulski
, the group's director, is both a composer and conductor. Under his supervision, the group works in close collaboration with the "J. Kurczewski Poznań Choral School".
Above all, the "Poznań Boys' Choir" mainly specialise in masterpieces of late and contemporary polyphonic works, developing a repertoire of twentieth and twenty-first century compositions and film music from composers such as Academy Award winner Jan Kaczmarek. They collaborate with known composers, conductors, orchestras and soloists.

 

The concert will also feature the Dzvinochok Boys' Choir from Kiev, led by Ruben Tolmachiov.

 

The cathedral church of St Alezandra is a Roman Catholic church, builtin the first half of the nineteenth century. It is located on the former Polish Kupiecki commune and is one of the four Roman Catholic churches in Kiev.

 

For more information, see: www.pchch.pl

Date: 30th of September, 2011

Venue: 'Kościół konkatedralny pw. św. Aleksandra' / 'Cathedral church of St Alezandra', Kiev

Organised by: 'Poznański Chór Chłopięcy' / 'Poznań Boys' Choir', City Cultural Institute-part of the Poznan City Office

Project cofinanced by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of the Republic of Poland.

Source: Adam Mickiewicz Institute

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